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Top Story:  Big Tech CEOs face Congress.

Views expressed in this geopolitical news summary are those of the reporters and correspondents.

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Russ Roberts
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https://hawaiiintelligencedaily.com

by Korva Coleman, Jill Hudson and Suzette Lohmeyer

First Up

Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Apple's Tim Cook, Google's Sundar Pichai and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg will face congressional questioning about whether tech has too much power.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Evan Vucci, Jeff Chiu, Jens Meyer/AP
Here's what we're following today.

The CEOs of Facebook, Amazon, Google and Apple will testify before Congress on Wednesday in a hearing over big tech’s market dominance. The tech executives plan to answer one overarching question: Do the biggest technology companies use their reach and power to hurt competitors and help themselves? Here’s what you need to know.

The Trump administration announced Tuesday it will continue its push to roll back DACA — the program that protects young immigrants brought to the country illegally as children — by rejecting new applicants. Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court ruled that the White House cannot end the DACA program; two weeks ago, a lower federal court ordered the administration to accept new DACA applicants. The administration’s actions are expected to prompt fresh legal action.

In a heated hearing before Congress on Tuesday, Attorney General William Barr forcefully defended the use of federal agents against protesters in Portland, Ore. Democrats say Barr is using the officers for political purposes. Barr insisted his decisions are independent and that he’s not President Trump’s “factotum.”

A woman was killed by a great white shark in Maine on Monday — the first fatal attack in the state's history. Investigators wonder if the shark mistook her for a seal because she was wearing a black wetsuit. Scientists are researching why more sharks have been spotted in places they don’t usually roam this year.

A White House request to include money in the coronavirus relief package to renovate FBI headquarters is opposed by a number of Senate Republicans. Democrats have accused President Trump of including the money to prevent the existing FBI building, which is across from the Trump Hotel in Washington, D.C., from being sold and redeveloped into a hotel that might compete with the Trump property.

If you're bitten or scratched by an animal with rabies, your doctor can give you a shot to prevent the virus from causing an infection. The same concept is being put to the test for the coronavirus. A study is underway to see whether an infusion of COVID-19 antibodies can protect someone who has been exposed to the virus and is at high risk of infection.

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Today's Listens

Maria Sherman's new book gives critical consideration to a too-often maligned phenomenon within pop music: the boy band.
Alex Fine/Courtesy of Black Dog & Leventhal

Why do people respect Elvis and his fans, but not the Backstreet Boys or One Direction? Author Maria Sherman was tired of the stigma, so she wrote a book tracing the history of boy bands. "If history is written by winners," Sherman says, "music history is written by rock critics, and they don't typically get along with boy bands." Click here to listen or read interview highlights.

We're all familiar with migration: Wildebeests gallop across Africa, Monarch butterflies flit across the Americas ... but did you know that forests migrate, too? This has happened over millennia, and climate change tends to be the driving force — pushing and pulling forests around the globe. But climate change is speeding up, and trees can't keep pace. Click here to listen or read the story.

Before You Go

Talk show host and comedian Ellen DeGeneres onstage at the Grammys in January.
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images
  • The Ellen DeGeneres Show is under internal investigation by WarnerMedia following a series of allegations of racism, workplace intimidation and other mistreatment made by employees of the popular daytime talk show.
  • A pub in the Australian outback has banned an emu named Carol and her brother Kevin for "bad behavior" after they learned to climb the stairs and created havoc inside. Bar staff say the pair have been snatching toast and french fries from customers, stealing from behind the bar and leaving droppings everywhere. 

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WORLD NEWS MONITORINGGet by Email •  RSS Published on 09:12 GMT
Armenia violates ceasefire with Azerbaijan 24 times on Feb.14 - Feb.15 15 February 2020 12:18 (UTC+04:00) 239 By Trend Over the past 24 hours, Armenian armed forces have violated the ceasefire along the line of contact between Azerbaijani and Armenian troops 24 times, Trend reports referring to the Azerbaijani Defense … Source: Azer News Published on 01:31 GMT
Here's where to fin…