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Chauvin guilty verdict is giant step.

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Accessed on 21 April 2021, 1203 UTC, Post 1180.

Source:   https://www.bbc.com/news/world

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Russ Roberts

https://www.hawaiigeopoliticalnews.com

BBC News World

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  1. Nigeria Android phones 'hit hard by infected apps'

    Kunle Falayi

    BBC News, Lagos

    Table

    One in nine Android mobile phones in Nigeria has malware-infected apps, according to mobile technology company Upstream which studied 415,000 transactions between November 2020 and January 2021.

    There were about 576 malicious apps in the country, its report said.

    Many of the apps are still active and have yet to be removed from Google Play store, it says.

    The report, which Upstream produced with its cybersecurity arm Secure D, identifies the top five apps with “suspicious behaviour” as:

    • XOS Launcher
    • HiOS Launcher
    • Phoenix Browser,
    • AHA Games and
    • Cobo Launcher Easily DIY Theme.

    On many Android phones sold in Nigeria, these apps come pre-installed. For instance, “com.android.fmradio", a radio player app is said to be responsible for 99.8 million fraudulent transactions.

    Only 2.6% of devices globally are reported to be harbouring high-risk apps, Upstream says.

    Some mobile markets are being targeted more than others by malicious actors, it says.

    The risk of fraud has increased as more businesses and individuals have been using the internet via smartphones during the coronavirus pandemic, according to the report.

    Upstream CEO Dimitris Maniatis says that digital novices in rural communities who depend on mobile phones to stay connected to the world may easily fall victim.

    Malware activities may be as simple as changing a mobile phone’s settings to something as dangerous as mining for passwords and personal information.

  2. Ghana actress who posted nude photo freed on bail

    Favour Nunoo

    BBC Pidgin

    Rosemond Brown
    Image caption: Public opinion was divided over Rosemond Brown's sentencing

    A court in Ghana's capital Accra has granted bail of 80,000 cedis ($13,900; £10,000) to actress Rosemond Brown, pending an appeal against her 90-day jail sentence for posting a naked photo of herself on social media beside her son.

    The court ordered Brown, popularly known as Akuapem Poloo, to report to police twice a week, and to hand over her passport. She can travel only with the court's permission.

    She was granted bail because she was a young first-time offender who had shown remorse and had pleaded guilty, the judge said.

    The court also considered the welfare of her son when deciding to release her on bail.

    Last week, the actress broke down in tears after she was jailed.

    She was found guilty of publishing obscene materials, engaging in domestic violence and undermining the privacy and integrity of another person - and was taken into custody.

    In the photo, posted last July to celebrate her son’s seventh birthday, she is crouching, facing the boy and holding his hands. He is wearing underpants. Her breasts are hidden by her long hair.

    The image when viral and there was a huge backlash online.

    The actress, who often posts photos of herself with her son on social media, apologised, but was invited for questioning by the police.

    Handing down sentence, Judge Christiana Cann said the jail sentence would serve as a deterrent to the general public given increasing levels of moral decadence in the country.

    Some agreed with the judge's remarks, though social media users had been calling for the actress's release using the hashtag #FreeAkuapemPoloo.

    Celebrities like Ghanaian rapper Sarkodie said it was harsh to separate a child from his mother.

    Andy Vortia
    Image caption: Andy Vortia, in spectacles, was the actress' lead counsel
  3. Businesses count loses after violence in Liberia

    Jonathan Paye-Layleh

    BBC News, Monrovia

    People in the streets of Ganta, Liberia
    Image caption: The region is where Liberia’s civil war started in 1989

    Police have been deployed and normal activities have resumed in Liberia's north-eastern city of Ganta, on the border with Guinea, following Tuesday’s violence over property dispute

    The inspector general of police, Patrick Sudue, spent Tuesday night in the town mobilising forces to put things under control and warned of stern action against violators of the law.

    But some businesses in the town are counting their losses after their joint warehouse containing tonnes of goods were reportedly set alight by unknown persons.

    The violence started when buildings belonging to a group of people who had lost a long-running case were demolished on orders of the court - in order to turn the vacant lands over to the winning side.

    This brought tensions between the two parties with people fighting along ethnic and religious lines. Schools and businesses in Ganta were shut as people fled to safety.

    Ganta has become known for land disputes since Liberia’s 14-year civil war ended 17 years ago. The region is where Liberia’s civil war started in 1989.

  4. Weymouth nurse's challenging journey to Australia to see terminally ill sister

    Video content

    Video caption: Tracy is now in quarantine in Australia following delays and flight cancellations.
  5. Analysis: What next for Chad after president's death

    BBC Monitoring

    The world through its media

    President Idriss Déby and his son Mahamat Idriss Déby
    Image caption: President Idriss Déby's son General Mahamat Idriss Déby will lead the transition

    President Idriss Déby ruled Chad with an iron fist, ruthlessly dispensing of critics and potential rivals. For instance, Chad has not had a prime minister since a coup attempt in 2018.

    A new constitution promulgated in December 2020 created the position of vice-president but this had not been filled by the time President Déby was killed.

    Ahead of the 11 April presidential poll, Mr Déby dismissed opposition protests, saying “democracy is not disorder”.

    He maintained his grip on power by appointing relatives and cronies to key posts. His son, General Mahamat Idriss Déby, was in charge of the presidential guard.

    This concentration of power in the presidential clan meant that there was no apparent political successor to Mr Déby.

    Thus, it was not entirely surprising that the military seized control when Mr Déby died.

    The army said that parliament and the government had been dissolved and a 15-member Transitional Military Council, led by Mahamat Déby, installed “to ensure the continuity of the state”. The military junta will govern for 18 months before overseeing fresh elections.

    The constitution has been suspended and will be replaced by a transitional charter to be decreed by Mahamat Déby.

    The late Déby had many sons, some of whom served in his government in different capacities. It is likely that there will be tension between Mahamat and some of his half-brothers.

    The opposition has rejected the transitional military council. Le Journal du Tchad reported that former prime minister Saleh Kebzabo and Mahamat Ahmad Alhabo, of the opposition Party of Freedoms and Development (PLD), have demanded for the transition to be led by the speaker of the national assembly.

    However, the opposition is decimated and divided and will not succeed in mounting a significant challenge to the military junta.

  6. Why are so many teens getting pregnant?

    Alan Kasujja

    BBC Africa Daily podcast

    19 year old mother Mercy Kwamboka is seen holding her 7 month old baby bump in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Covid-19 has put teenage girls’ futures at risk.

    Thousands of young girls across the continent never returned to school after lockdowns were lifted. And that’s because, while they were away, many of these teenagers got pregnant.

    In fact, spikes in teen pregnancies have been reported in several countries across sub-Saharan Africa.

    “We have more cases of girls that have fallen victims of teenage pregnancy, that have dropped out of school,” says Hope Nankunda, who works with the Girls Not Brides campaign in Uganda.

    “[These girls] may actually never go back to school again as a result of the pandemic.”

    So how did the problem get so bad? And what exactly can be done about it?

    Find out in Wednesday’s edition of Africa Daily.

    Subscribe to the show on BBC Sounds or wherever you get your podcasts.

  7. Video content

    Video caption: George Floyd: Family reacts to Derek Chauvin murder conviction

    George Floyd's family react to the murder conviction of Derek Chauvin who knelt on Floyd's neck.

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